Banchory girl wins national competition

editorial image
0
Have your say

A pupil from Banchory Academy has won a national creative writing competition which commemorates a World War 1 battle.

Iseabail Duncan won in the best short story category of the Creating Gallopoli competition, run by the University of Stirling.

The contest was set up in remembrance of the 100 year anniversary of the First World War Battle of Gallipoli.

Secondary school pupils across Scotland were encouraged to submit a poem or short story that recreated a scene from the Gallipoli campaign.

Iseabail, who won for her short story ‘Dear Father’, said: “I am incredibly delighted to have had my story chosen as the winner of Creating Gallipolli 2015.

“I found it fascinating to be able to look back in time, past the statistics, to see how war affects each person as an individual.”

Creating Gallipolli was launched as part of a joint campaign with the Scottish Government Commemorations Panel to remember the battle.

Professor Holger Nehring, Head of History and Politics at the University of Stirling, said: “Congratulations to the winners for their excellent short story and poem.

“The university was honoured to be involved in organising the commemorative campaign together with the Scottish Government, and it was truly moving to read how Scottish pupils today brought the suffering and experiences of both British and Turkish soldiers to life.”

The competition attracted more than 300 entries from 25 secondary schools all over Scotland.

Professor Nehring added: “It helped raise awareness in schools of the impact of the First World War, which probably claimed the lives of more than 1000,000 Scots.”

The certificates were presented to Iseabail and the other winner - Adam Duncan from Shawlands Academy for his poem ‘Slaughter at Gallipoli’ -at a ceremony at Holyrood on Thursday, February 25, by MSP Fiona Hyslop.

The cabinet secretary for Culture, Europe and External Affairs, said: “The winning entries are extremely moving and excellent pieces of writing and I have no doubt they have gained a greater understanding of the horrors of war.”