Volunteers tackle Dee plant menace

BP volunteers get to grips with the Himalayan balsam plant at Maryculter
BP volunteers get to grips with the Himalayan balsam plant at Maryculter

Volunteers from BP have been helping rid banks of the Lower Dee of a plant menace.

More than 40 staff from the oil company joined the River Dee Trust at Maryculter clearing a large area of Himalayan balsam, which has been overwhelming huge swathes of native vegetation.

The Trust’s work over the last two years has shown that removing the fast-spreading, invasive plant before it can set seed greatly helps the local environment to recover the following year.

Although the areas will need to be re-visited over several years, the scale of the problem should diminish year after year.

A Trust spokesman said: “The big team of enthusiastic volunteers covered a large area during the day and can be satisfied that they’ve helped to restore part of their local environment, which cuts through the heart of Aberdeen.

“A big thank you is owed to the BP volunteers who came out and got to work.”

The River Dee Trust and Board are delivering invasive non-native plant removal throughout the Dee catchment, with the focus being where the problem is greatest – downstream from Drumoak.