LibDems speak out over possible ‘identity crisis’

iris scan for security or identification. Eye with scanner and computer interface
iris scan for security or identification. Eye with scanner and computer interface

SNP plans to ­create a “super ID” database could breach human rights and data protection laws, civil liberties campaigners have warned.

Liberal Democrats in Scotland are leading the opposition to the controversial new government initiative.

SNP ministers are consulting on plans that would see 120 public bodies gain access to your private data in a new super ID database.

Sir Robert Smith MP

Sir Robert Smith, MP for West Aberdeenshire and Kincardine, said: “SNP ministers are consulting on plans that would see 120 public bodies gain access to your private data in a new super ID database.”

Privacy campaigners are worried that this could be the first step towards introducing ID cards by the back door and would put private information at risk.

Sir Robert added: “Liberal Democrats in government scrapped Labour’s illiberal ID cards proposals and stopped the Tories from introducing the “snoopers charter.

‘‘Now we are leading the campaign to ensure that the SNP government review these dangerous super ID database plans.

“Help keep our personal information personal. Sign our petition and help persuade the SNP to drop these dangerous and illiberal proposals.”

According to the Open Rights Group (ORG), proposals to expand the ­National Health Service Central Register will pave the way for a national ID register in Scotland.

The digital rights cam­paigners claim that the consultation is flawed, misleading and could “fundamentally change the relationship between citizen and state”.

ORG executive director, Jim Killock, said: “Government proposals that jeopardise our right to privacy need proper consideration.

“The SNP rejected a national ID register when the UK government tried to introduce ID cards.

“These proposals could pave the way for a similar scheme in Scotland and are being introduced without a proper debate by the public or MSPs.”

A Scottish Government spokeswoman said there were no proposals for a single database.

She added: “We take the security and ­privacy of this data very seriously indeed, and any sharing would only take place under tightly controlled arrangements,”