Pupils discover how houses are built on visit to Alford development

A group of pupils from Tough Primary have visited Silver Birches, a new community currently being developed by Stewart Milne Homes
A group of pupils from Tough Primary have visited Silver Birches, a new community currently being developed by Stewart Milne Homes

Youngsters from Tough Primary in Alford learned about homes and house building thanks to a company founded by one of the school’s famous former pupils.

P1-4 pupils have been studying the different ways people around the world live including different jobs related to house building, the materials used and how homes are actually created and built.

They were keen to bring their learning to life and with Stewart Milne Homes currently building locally, a field trip to the new Silver Birches development was arranged.

The children learned how the homes are built, what materials are used and why; toured some of the new houses and visited the selection centre to see the process homeowners get to go through.

Kerry Porter, acting head teacher, said: “The pupils found their trip to the Silver Birches community incredibly interesting.

“They loved hearing about the different types of jobs involved in house building, touring the show home and understanding the choices people have to make when choosing their new home, they especially liked seeing the materials used and what walls look like on the inside.

“The fact they often pass the development when going to activities at Alford Campus made it more meaningful to them as Silver Birches is part of their local community.

“The children also really liked hearing that Stewart Milne himself went to Tough Primary, and I think the trip may have inspired some of them to follow in his footsteps.”

Neil Thomson, regional director for Stewart Milne Homes North, added: “It was a pleasure to host the children from Tough Primary and teach them the way we build here at Stewart Milne Homes.

“The children really loved learning about all of the materials and by the sounds of it, we may have even met some of our future apprentices.”