Banchory Academy triumphs

2017 STEM IN THE PIPELINE CHALLENGE WINNERS BANCHORY ACADEMY PICTURED OUTSIDE BP HEADQUARTERS IN DYCE.
PIC (L TO R) BEN STRACHAN, DANIEL BIRCH, LAUREN LIVERSIDGE, KAZIO WILOWSKI (TEAM CAPTAIN) JACK BANFIELD AND DANNY SKINNER
2017 STEM IN THE PIPELINE CHALLENGE WINNERS BANCHORY ACADEMY PICTURED OUTSIDE BP HEADQUARTERS IN DYCE. PIC (L TO R) BEN STRACHAN, DANIEL BIRCH, LAUREN LIVERSIDGE, KAZIO WILOWSKI (TEAM CAPTAIN) JACK BANFIELD AND DANNY SKINNER

Pupils from Banchory Academy have beaten their rivals in this year’s STEM in the Pipeline competition, which tasked them with finding a solution to an oil and gas challenge.

The Reservoir Dogs from the Academy took first prize, and walked away with the kudos of being the best at last week’s final held in BP’s North Sea headquarters in Dyce.

Cheeriosity from Aboyne Academy was given the innovation prize for their hard work, dedication and overall effort.

Run by TechFest, STEM in the Pipeline began in August, when 15 teams of senior pupils were set an oil field challenge designed to test their skills in physics, maths, chemistry and geology.

STEM in the Pipeline is sponsored by BP, Chevron and ConocoPhillips, and supported by the University of Aberdeen, the Energy Institute, the Petroleum Exploration Society of Great Britain, the Project Management Institute and the Oil and Gas Authority (OGA).

Each organisation provided volunteer mentors who gave up their time to offer guidance and support to the pupils throughout the project.

The teams took part in a series of challenging tasks to produce a Field Development Plan for the fictional STEM oil field.

The tasks covered subsurface work, production profiling, separator design, safety and the calculation of CO2 emissions.

Kazio Wilowski (16), from the winning Banchory Academy team, said: “It was a great experience to work on a big project without having deadlines so we had to project manage our time, preparing us for university.

“Our mentors from ConocoPhillips were really helpful if we had a question and we went to visit their office. It was also extremely worthwhile to see an actual job and how lessons from the classroom apply in the real world.”

Alies Bartelds, acting managing director of TechFest, told pupils they should all be very proud of themselves.

“Every year at STEM in the Pipeline the pupils completely trump our expectations. It was extremely difficult for the judges to pick a winner this year because the pupils were so thorough and innovative with their solutions. A few of the energy professionals remarked that they would be pleased to offer the students a job based on their entries, so I think that demonstrates just how strong they are.”